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18. September 2018 · Comments Off on Kinderhook Lake Selected for Study by Grad Student · Categories: AIS, General Information, Water quality, Water treatment

Kinderhook Lake has been selected for study by a student in the Professional Science Master’s Lake Management Program at the State University of NY at Oneonta. This is the only Lake Management degree program in the US. Over the course of one year, Amanda Setteducate will study and evaluate the lake’s water quality and nutrient levels, invasive species, watershed, and issues important to the lake community. It is expected that the study will result in a report that will provide recommendations for implementation of future lake management efforts. The KLC Board of Directors and Water Quality Committee is excited to work with Amanda and is looking forward to receiving assistance from her and the Lake Management program.

You can read more at Lake Management Graduate Program. If you have any questions about the Program or what Amanda will be doing at Kinderhook Lake, you can contact her at settan29@oneonta.edu.

 

 

06. July 2018 · Comments Off on HABs Health Advisory Cancelled · Categories: General Information, Water quality

Effective Friday, July 6, 2018, the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has lifted the Health Advisory for Harmful Algal Blooms on Kinderhook Lake that was issued on June 29, 2018.

DEC staff accompanied a member of our water quality committee today on a site visit around the lake and saw no evidence of any algal blooms currently on the lake. As such, the advisory has been lifted and the advisory signs around the lake will be down-posted tomorrow morning.

To be clear, the lake was NEVER closed and despite news reported on TV and in some of our local papers, the advisory was only to be on the lookout for HABs and to avoid the blooms, if spotted.

29. June 2018 · Comments Off on HABs Reminder During the Coming Heat Wave · Categories: General Information, Water quality

With the extended heat wave forecast over the next week or so, people and pets will want to stay cool in the lake. This is a good opportunity to remind everyone to be cautious of harmful algal blooms (HABs) that can form anytime, but especially during these hot spells. The following information is provided for easy reference and includes links to websites and related documents. It was provided by DEC through the Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Additional information can be found on Page 3 of the Spring 2018 KLC News.

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People Exposure

If you think you may have been exposed to a HAB and are experiencing symptoms, contact your physician or, in the case of severe reactions, seek immediate medical attention. You should inform your physician and your local health department if you were exposed to an algal bloom, both to help determine the proper course of treatment and to determine if others should also be notified of this potential risk. More information about these symptoms can be found on the Department of Health Blue-green Algae webpage. Swimming at regulated beaches will greatly reduce your risk of exposure to HABs, since beaches are closely monitored for the presence of blooms. Beach closures by health officials are conducted to protect swimmers.

Animal Exposure

HABs cells can stick to animal fur and become concentrated when the animal cleans itself. Rinse your dog, pet or livestock with clean water and seek veterinarian medical assistance should your animal show any signs of distress. HABs may release a fast-acting nerve toxin that can be dangerous for pets, particularly dogs that swim within blooms. Symptoms of HABs exposure for dogs include:

  • Stumbling, seizures, convulsions, paralysis
  • Excessive salivation or drooling
  • Disorientation, inactivity or depression
  • Elevated heart rate, and difficulty breathing

If you see or suspect any of these symptoms, particularly within 30 minutes to a few hours after exposure to an algal bloom, seek immediate veterinarian care.

Long-term exposure to algal liver toxins may lead to symptoms such as repeated vomiting (green liquid), diarrhea or tarry (bloody) stool, loss of appetite, anorexia, jaundice (yellowing of eye whites or gums), abdominal swelling tender to the touch, cyanosis (bluish coloration) of skin, dark urine or reduced urine output. Your veterinarian should be consulted to see if veterinarian assistance is appropriate. Any information you can provide to the veterinarian about the potential duration of algae exposure will help to determine the appropriate course of action.

New York Sea Grant published a Dogs and Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) (PDF) (809 KB) brochure. The brochure includes descriptions of common symptoms and what to do, information about toxins and how dogs are exposed, how to reduce your dog’s risk of exposure and how to report suspected blooms.

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25. June 2018 · Comments Off on Copper Sulfate Treatment – June 25th · Categories: Water quality, Water treatment

******* WARNING *******
Copper Sulfate will be applied to Kinderhook Lake
Monday evening, June 25th

See the FAQ page for information and warnings
about Copper Sulfate treatment for algae control

To help reduce the spread of this aquatic invasive species, a water chestnut hand-pulling event is planned for Saturday, June 23, 9:00 am – 11:00 am. We need two dozen volunteers for this event to be successful. As in past years, please meet at the north end of the lake with your kayak, canoe, rowboat, raft, or any vessel that can navigate very shallow water. Don’t forget heavy gloves and perhaps a rake. Pulled weeds will be transferred to the ECO-Harvester and brought to shore for disposal. This year, a few teams of volunteers may be dispersed to various coves around the lake where water chestnut growth has been identified. Light refreshments will be provided. In the event of pouring rain, the ‘pull’ will take place at the same time on Sunday, June 24. Please come and be part of the solution.

Why don’t we pull the water chestnuts with the ECO-Harvester? Two reasons: (1) Our DEC permit does not allow it, and (2) There is a risk of damage to the harvester drum if we run it in the shallow water where most of the water chestnuts are growing.

******* WARNING *******
Copper Sulfate will be applied to Kinderhook Lake
Monday morning, August 7th

See the FAQ page for information and warnings
about Copper Sulfate treatment for algae control

******* WARNING *******
Copper Sulfate will be applied to Kinderhook Lake
Thursday morning, July 20th

See the FAQ page for information and warnings
about Copper Sulfate treatment for algae control

A record 22 volunteers showed up at the north end of the lake on the morning of June 10th to help hand-pull water chestnuts. Due to previous year’s hand-pulling events as well as the use of our cutter boat, we had far fewer water chestnuts to deal with this year, and 22 volunteers made a huge dent in the remaining weeds. We are making a difference.

Thanks to the following volunteers who made this event so successful:

John Bruford Lisa Benfield Jen Clark
Terry and Bill Cleary Dawn and Mike Franceour Leah Gorman (Capital/Mohawk PRISM)
Jim Hodgkins Ron Jensis Bernie Kelleher
Robin and Dan Langer Linda Leader George Longworth
Diane and Doug Petersen Lisa and Steve Puvogel Bridget Roos
Dan Riozzi Rick Theriault

Additional thanks to:

  • Lisa and Steve Puvogel for allowing access to the lake across their property for our dump trailer; the dump trailer was used to transport the pulled weeds for disposal.
  • Dawn and Mike Franceour for the use of their boat to provide refreshments.
  • Steve Sigler for the use of his boat to transport the weeds to the dump trailer.

 

Check it out! Thanks to board member Ken Bosen, we have a brand new Invasive Species Disposal Station next to the access gate at the Rt. 28 launch site. Please make good use of it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s here …. and just in case you’ve been living under a rock and haven’t heard by now ….

Please come to the KLIA Community Hall on Saturday, June 17, 9:30 am to noon to see what your generous support has brought to Kinderhook Lake. Find out how and why the Eco-Harvester was selected and how it will be used to battle our invasive weed problems. Take a close-up look and learn how it works. The Eurasian Milfoil is already shaking in its stalks! Refreshments will be served.